CV Layout

CV Templates

There are 3 main styles of resumes:

Chronological Resume: A chronological CV starts by listing your work history, with the most recent position listed first. Employers typically prefer this type of resume because it’s easy to see what jobs you have held and when you have worked at them.

Functional Resume: A functional resume focuses on your skills and experience, rather than on your chronological work history. It is used most often by people who are changing careers or who have gaps in their employment history.

Combination Resume: A combination resume lists your skills and experience first. Your employment history is listed next. With this type of CV you can highlight the skills you have that are relevant to the job you are applying for, and also provide the chronological work history that employers prefer.

CV templateSo which do you choose? For me I prefer the Combination, or as I call it “the best of both worlds”.

The first CV you write should be what I call your “uber CV”.  This means that includes everything you ever did, even if it is an additional job, or duty. This CV will be way more than the recommended 1-2 pages long. This CV will be updated constantly to capture everything you have ever done. To do this you will need to gather every piece of information you can. Things to gather:

  • Education details
  • Work History
  • Old CV’s
  • Referee contact details
  • Any other information that can provide information and data for your CV

So now time to write, or actually type. Make sure you pick an easy to read font and seize and make sure you save it in multiple formats to include text. The reason is some sites will allow you to up load a resume but only in certain formats. When writing it, as a minimum you should include the following; name, email address, phone number, and if you have it your LinkedIn profile. As for address, current city will suffice and skype details should be included if you have an account.

When writing you CV make sure to utilize clear measurable achievements. For example do not just say “increased hiring”, instead say “increased hiring 50%”. This not only states what you did, but gives a clear, measured, and quantifiable number that potential employees can wrap their arms around. Also remember when writing it in allot of cases it will end up in an “applicant tracking system” were it will be searched on. When it is searched for it will be searched for based on the buzz words that are appropriate for the job, so be sure you include them in your resume. This includes software, skills, attributes, and industry buzz words.

Also when writing your resume you need to use action words, when possible. Below are a few, not all, but a few action words you can use.

General Skills
Achieved
Arranged
Built
Collected
Contributed
Delivered
Designed
Dispatched
Examined
Improved
Increased
Informed
Maintained
Organized
Performed
Purchased
Prepared
Scheduled
Supervised
Trained
Technical Skills
Assembled
Balanced
Built
Calculated
Cut
Designed
Detected
Developed
Formed
Generated
Inspected
Installed
Maintained
Molded
Operated
Packaged
Processed
Remodeled
Sales Skills
Accomplished
Arbitrated
Budgeted
Computed
Consulted
Demonstrated
Dissuaded
Exceeded
Forecasted
Generated
Increased
Influenced
Marketed
Ordered
Persuaded
Produced
Projected
Promoted
Realized
Saved
Sold
Communication Skills
Addressed
Authored
Clarified
Created
Demonstrated
Drafted
Presented
Persuaded
Proofread
Reported
Clerical Skills
Assigned
Balanced
Catalogued
Charted
Compiled
Composed
Distributed
Edited
Followed up
Identified
Ordered
Planned
Prepared
Recorded
Helping Skills
Assisted
Attended
Comforted
Consoled
Encouraged
Facilitated
Guided
Helped
Nursed
Reassured
Served
Supported
Tutored

So now you have this big, long “uber CV”. So what’s next?

Next you start applying to jobs, and you copy out of your “uber CV” the parts that are specific to the job you are applying for. For example, if you are applying for a Senior Data Analyst job, you copy out the Data Analyst specific portions of your “uber CV” thus creating a “Data Analyst CV”. Now you have a Data Analyst specific CV that can be used for applying to recruiting jobs and it was all quick and easy as cut and paste. Remember to try to keep it to no more than 2 pages. The key is “try”, if you have enough experience and it goes longer, so be it.

A cover letter is optional and are used less now than in the past. A cover letter introduces you more formally, announces you candidacy, and should provide some information that is not in your CV about how you qualify for the position.

Suggested cover letter layout:

  • List your name, email address, and telephone number with area code at the top of the page.
  • Address the cover letter to a specific person if possible.
  • First paragraph: Begin with an introduction paragraph to explain how you learned about the job or the company. (Job fair, newspaper, friend.) Name the specific position that you are applying for.
  • Second paragraph: Briefly write up your skills to aim toward the open position and explain what you can bring to the job. Do not simply repeat the information in your resume. Be creative when explaining why you are the best job match. The goal of the cover letter is to encourage the employer to read your resume.
  • Third paragraph: Explain the next action you will take. For example: I will telephone in one week to follow up on this position. Be sure to thank the employer for their time, stating that you look forward to interviewing with them.
  • Close and sign your letter. For example:

Now for the final piece, the thank you note for after interviews of any kind.  The thank you note should be short, concise, and above all appreciate of their time. General guideline:

  • Greeting
  • Thank you for taking time to interview
  • Statement of how you feel you fit after the interview and the information you found out via the interview
  • A wrap up such as; “I look forward to hearing from you”.
  • Your name

So there you have it, you are fully armed to write your resume, cover letter, and thank you notes. Time to start posting and applying and finding your new job.

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5 thoughts on “CV Layout

  1. Pingback: Resume & Cover Letter Help From RIFT SUCCESS | RIFT SUCCESS

  2. Pingback: Should you include a cover letter when emailing a resume? « Resume Rebel Videoblog

  3. Pingback: CV Keywords – Why you have to use them « jobcontax.com

  4. Pingback: Guide to Emailing Recruiters « jobcontax.com

  5. Pingback: Picking the Best Keywords for Your CV | jobcontax.com

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